Water

Cool, clear water, our bodies most important nutrient.

Since our bodies are 1/2 water, water is our mostimportant nutrient. We replace 80 to 96 ounces of water daily. Water is especiallynecessary when we exercise and sweat. Conserve water in your body by dressingappropriately, hydrating, and drinking 8 to 10 cups of water daily.

Cool, Clear Water.

The most important nutrient.

 

Our  bodies  are more than half water. We must replace, on the average 80 to 96 ounces of water per  day that is used or lost by respiration, urination, and perspiration.

 

Water

Come July and August, no one will argue with you about the importance of water in our body.

When  your body is low even one quart of fluid, your  ability  to sweat is reduced. Consequently, body temperature begins to rise.

Protect yourself in warm weather by:

1. Dressing correctly

Light-colored  clothing reflects heat. Your head is cooler in  a light-colored,  ventilated cap than it is when bare. You are  not correctly  dressed  until you have applied sunscreen: SPF  24  or higher.

We  can get some water by eating foods that are high  in  water. but  most of our water will come from drinking eight to ten  cups of water per day.

2. Hydrating

Drink  before,  during, and after your exercise.  don’t  rely  on thirst  to stimulate rehydration and don’t rely on sports  drinks entirely.  Electrolyte  loss is less important than  fluid  loss. Unfortunately,  beer won’t do the trick either, as  several  fans found out at the Ballpark in Arlington, Texas once.

  3. Weighing yourself

Weigh  before  and after exercise. Losing two  pounds  of  weight means  you  are down about a quart of liquid.  Persistent  weight loss over several days of hot weather exercise usually means  you are dehydrating, maybe dangerously so.

A vacation that combines fitness and fun can be just what you need to relax and stay in shape. Just remember, though,  that high  fluid losses lead to poor performance and can lead to  dangerous heat stroke.

Our  bodies  are more than half water. Adequate water consumption helps us utilize key nutrients, helps the body’s immune system, and reduces fluid retention.

We must replace, on the average 80 to 96 ounces of water per  day that is used or lost by respiration, urination, and perspiration.

We  can get some water by eating foods that are high  in  water. but  most of our water will come from drinking eight to ten  cups of water per day.

We  can  get some water by eating foods that are high  in  water as you can see from the water content of the foods below:

 
Range of Water Content
80-95% Fruits and vegetables
87% Milk
50-75% Meats, poultry, and fish
35% Baked goods like bread

One last thing: Avoid  excessive use of carbonated and caffeinated beverages to meet your daily water requirement. They tend to have a dehydrating effect.

More about water.

 

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