Organic More Nutritious

Organic Food and Nutrition, Organics More Nutritious

Organic foods: Organic growers often use heirloom varieties that have superior taste, color, and nutritional potential. Color alone is very important to nutrition.

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Organic Food and Organics

OrganicFoods and Nutrition The Organic Web

By DH Owens with additions by CyberParent staff

Eating organic foods:Even though few nutritional studies have been done comparing heirlooms to other types of crops, it makes sense that the lack of chemical exposure minimal genetic alterations will result in better foods.

More information about organic foods:

Transition into Organic Foods Interested in changing your eating habits? This educational and fact-filled book is a simple read with easy to understand differences between conventional, organic, and natural foods. More Information

Organic growers often use heirloom varieties that have superior taste, color, and nutritional potential. Color alone is very important to nutrition. Read more about color and nutrition.

Even though few nutritional studies have been done comparing heirlooms to other types of crops, (probably because much funding comes from big agribusiness), it makes sense that the lack of chemical exposure minimal genetic alterations will result in better foods.

Heirlooms are usually “open-pollinated,” which means they are naturally fertilized by wind, insects, birds and mammals. Open-pollinated seeds, unlike commercial hybrids and genetically modified seeds, will produce seed, which if properly controlled to avoid cross-pollination, will reproduce true to form. Open-pollinated seeds also allow farmers to adapt plants to local conditions over time.

In addition, organic produce is sometimes local, although that is not often the case with supermarkets like Kroger’s or Safeway or even the super health food stores like Whole Foods. The super stores import vegetables for miles and miles, often their organic produce is not even grown in the United States.

Local produce is always fresher. The fresher produce is, the more likely it is to be nutritious.

During the growing season in your area, it is possible to get local vegetables from farmer’s markets.

Look for a certified organic grower, not a broker (someone who buys from distributors or other farmers and resells).

I suggest certified growers. I know some farmers grow organically without being certified. However, some farmers also say they grow organically when they do not.

Regardless of how much the USDA organic certification program gets diluted by industry (and they are already trying), it is still the greatest assurance we have that food is truly organic.

The Organic Food Guide A practical guide to food and how organic foods are related to nutrition and health. Understand why organic foods are so important, both for our health and for our environment. More Information

Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening This will be a reference book you will use often as you create your organic garden. It is a classic in its field. More Information

Organic foods for health of people, animals, and planet earth.

Organic, Inc. : Natural Foods and How They Grew Business writer Samuel Fromartz gives a balanced and honest look at organic food from its humble beginnings to the present. Answer questions like "what is organic food" and " why are so many of us buying it." More Information

Vegetables are less nutritious than they were 50 years ago

A study from Bio-Communications Research Institute at, Wichita, Kansas and Biochemical Institute, The University of Texas, Austin evaluated possible changes in USDA nutrient content data for 43 garden crops between 1950 and 1999, then considered their potential causes. The amounts of key nutrients like protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, riboflavin and vitamin C in vegetables have noticeably declined over the past 50 years, according to data collected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Declines were six percent for protein, 15 percent for iron, 20 percent for vitamin C, and 38 percent for riboflavin.

Today’s commonly grown vegetable varieties may be less nutritious than the varieties grown 50 years ago because they have been selectively bred for fast growth and high production, which leaves them less time to acquire nutrients. Scientists concluded there were potential trade-offs between yield and nutrient content.

Additional information about organic food and organics.

The Organic Garden Book Work with nature to create organic flowers, fruit, and vegetables. Grow multiple veggies in a small plot and create a healthy outside environment for your family. More Information

The Organic Food Guide A practical guide to and how organic foods are related to nutrition and health. Understand why organic foods are so important, both for our health and for our environment. More Information

The Organic Garden Book Work with nature to create organic flowers, fruit, and vegetables. Grow multiple veggies in a small plot and create a healthy outside environment for your family. More Information

Transition into Organic Foods Interested in changing your eating habits? This educational and fact-filled book is a simple read with easy to understand differences between conventional, organic, and natural foods. More Information

Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening This will be a reference book you will use often as you create your organic garden. It is a classic in its field. More Information

Organic, Inc. : Natural Foods and How They Grew Business writer Samuel Fromartz gives a balanced and honest look at organic food from its humble beginnings to the present. Answer questions like "what is organic food" and " why are so many of us buying it." More Information

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